Marine Mammal Commission

Meet the Commission

The Marine Mammal Commission consists of three members (i.e., Commissioners) who are nominated by the President and confirmed by the Senate. The Commissioners must be knowledgeable in marine ecology and resource management as mandated by the Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA).

The Commission is assisted in its work by a nine-member Committee of Scientific Advisors (CSA) on Marine Mammals. Committee members are appointed by the Chairman of the Commission after consultation with the Chairman of the Council on Environmental Quality, the Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, the Director of the National Science Foundation, and the Chairman of the National Academy of Sciences. A special advisor on native affairs is also appointed to the committee. The MMPA requires that committee members be knowledgeable in marine ecology and marine mammal affairs.

The Commission and CSA are supported by a staff of 14 full-time employees, including an Executive Director, who is appointed by the Chairman with the approval of the Commissioners.

Our Commission staff office is located in Bethesda, Maryland. Learn more about contacting or visiting us.

Commissioners

Daryl J. Boness

Daryl J. Boness, Ph.D.

Commission Chairman

Daryl J. Boness

Daryl J. Boness, Ph.D.

Commission Chairman

University of New England

Biddeford, Maine

Daryl Boness currently serves as Chairman of the Marine Mammal Commission, having been appointed to that position by President Obama and confirmed by the Senate in 2010. He also serves as Editor-in-Chief of the Society for Marine Mammalogy’s scientific journal, Marine Mammal Science, having been selected by the Board of Governors in 2007. He earned an M.A. in human psychophysiology in 1973 and a Ph.D. in animal behavior (behavioral ecology) in 1979. He received his Ph.D. from Dalhousie University in Nova Scotia, Canada. Dr. Boness joined the staff at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Zoological Park in 1978, where he worked his entire career. During his tenure at the Smithsonian, he served both as a Curator of Mammals and as a research scientist. His research focused on the reproductive strategies of pinnipeds, both mating systems and maternal care patterns, although he also mentored students who worked on similar questions in seabirds. Dr. Boness’ studies included working on about a third of the various species and subspecies of pinnipeds, including representatives of all three taxonomic families. He retired after 26 years with the Smithsonian, during which he became a senior scientist and had been Head of the Department of Conservation Biology. Dr. Boness served on the Commission’s Committee of Scientific Advisors on Marine Mammals for 17 years prior to being confirmed as a Commissioner. For a list of his publications, visit http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Daryl_Boness.

Frances M.D. Gulland

Frances M.D. Gulland, Vet. M.B., Ph.D.

Frances M.D. Gulland

Frances M.D. Gulland, Vet. M.B., Ph.D.

The Marine Mammal Center

Sausalito, California

Frances Gulland is currently a senior scientist at the Marine Mammal Center in Sausalito, California, where she has been actively involved in the veterinary care of marine mammals and research into marine mammal diseases since 1994. She received a veterinary degree from the University of Cambridge, United Kingdom, in 1984, and a Ph.D. in zoology in 1991. Dr. Gulland has served on a number of federal and state advisory panels, including the Working Group on Marine Mammal Unusual Mortality Events, the Hawaiian Monk Seal Recovery Team, and California’s Ocean Protection Council and Oiled Wildlife Care Network. In 2000, she joined the Committee of Scientific Advisors of the Marine Mammal Commission, and in 2011, was appointed to serve as one of three Commissioners.

Michael Tillman, Ph.D.

Michael Tillman, Ph.D.

Center for Marine Biodiversity and Conservation, Scripps Institution of Oceanography

La Jolla, California

Michael Tillman serves as a Commissioner on the Marine Mammal Commission, having been appointed by the President and confirmed by the Senate in 2010. A Viet Nam era veteran and member of the Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribe of Southeast Alaska, he received his Ph.D. in fisheries science with a minor in natural resource economics from the University of Washington in 1972. Joining the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) in 1972, Dr. Tillman variously undertook research on the population dynamics of whale stocks, served on the U.S. delegation to the International Whaling Commission (IWC), directed the National Marine Mammal Laboratory, chaired the IWC’s Scientific Committee, and directed the International Union for Conservation of Nature’s Conservation Monitoring Center on a three-year detail. Appointed as an NMFS Senior Executive in 1988, he served as the agency’s first Chief Scientist, its Deputy Director, and finally as Director of its Southwest Fisheries Science Center. Retiring in 2004, Dr. Tillman worked as a self-employed consultant for 6 and a half years, focusing on the whaling issue and the subsistence use of marine wildlife resources. His extensive experience in international conservation included Presidential appointments as Deputy U.S. Commissioner to IWC (1994–2004) and as U.S. Commissioner to the Inter-American Tropical Tuna Commission (1994–1999). In addition to his work at the Commission, Dr. Tillman is also a research associate working on marine wildlife conservation issues at the Center for Marine Biodiversity and Conservation, Scripps Institution of Oceanography. As a Commissioner, he continues to pursue his interests in Alaskan and Arctic issues, subsistence use, IWC, and other international conservation efforts.

Committee of Scientific Advisors on Marine Mammals

Randall R. Reeves

Randall R. Reeves, Ph.D.

CSA Chairman

Randall R. Reeves

Randall R. Reeves, Ph.D.

CSA Chairman

Okapi Wildlife Associates

Hudson, Quebec, Canada

Randall Reeves was born, raised, and educated in Nebraska. He relocated to the East Coast in 1970, earned his M.A. in public policy from Princeton in 1973, and soon after that became hooked on whales. As a research associate at the Smithsonian Institution and later the Arctic Biological Station near Montreal, he carried out numerous contract studies, including several for the Marine Mammal Commission in the 1970s and 1980s. Dr. Reeves’s doctoral dissertation at McGill University (1992) was on the history and management of narwhal hunting. During the 1980s and 1990s, he was involved in field research and conservation initiatives on whales in Alaska, the Canadian Arctic, and Greenland; on right whales and other cetaceans in the North Atlantic; and on river dolphins and coastal cetaceans in Asia and South America. He is also an expert on the history of whaling. As Chairman of the International Union for Conservation of Nature Species Survival Commission’s Cetacean Specialist Group since 1996, Dr. Reeves has been responsible for preparing and evaluating Red List assessments; drafting conservation action plans; and advising government agencies, intergovernmental bodies, and non-governmental organizations. He has published numerous articles in scientific journals and co-authored or co-edited books on marine mammal conservation and science. He is a longtime member of the International Whaling Commission’s Scientific Committee and Mexico’s international vaquita recovery committee and recently served on the President of Mexico’s special advisory commission to save the vaquita. Dr. Reeves joined the Committee of Scientific Advisors in 2006.

Robin W. Baird

Robin W. Baird, Ph.D.

Robin W. Baird

Robin W. Baird, Ph.D.

Cascadia Research Collective

Olympia, Washington

Robin Baird received his Ph.D. in biology in 1994 from Simon Fraser University and was a post-doctoral fellow at Dalhousie University (Halifax, Nova Scotia) from 1996 to 2001. He has worked with marine mammals since 1986, focusing primarily on odontocete population assessment, stock structure, habitat use, and behavior. He has also worked as a research biologist with Cascadia Research Collective since 2003 and is a member of the False Killer Whale Take Reduction Team. Dr. Baird is an affiliate faculty member at Hawai’i Pacific University and a member of the International Union for Conservation of Nature’s Cetacean Specialist Group. He joined the Marine Mammal Commission’s Committee of Scientific Advisors on Marine Mammals in 2011. Information on his research can be found at http://www.cascadiaresearch.org/hawaii.htm and https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=60qrzj4AAAAJ&hl=en.

Jason Baker

Jason Baker, Ph.D.

Jason Baker

Jason Baker, Ph.D.

NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center

Honolulu, Hawaii

Jason Baker is a marine biologist at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA’s) Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC). He earned a B.A. in Russian and Eastern European international studies and an M.S. in wildlife sciences from the University of Washington, followed by a Ph.D. in zoology from the University of Aberdeen, Scotland. From 1984 to 1998, he worked at the National Marine Mammal Laboratory, primarily researching northern fur seals and Steller sea lions. He has conducted field research in Alaska, the continental U.S. West Coast, the former Soviet Far East, Hawaii, Scotland, and American Samoa. In 1998, he accepted a position leading NOAA’s Hawaiian monk seal population assessment research. In the mid-2000s, he led the establishment of the PIFSC’s cetacean and marine turtle stock assessment programs. Dr. Baker is the author or co-author of more than 40 peer-reviewed publications on a diverse range of topics, including population dynamics, research techniques, population and foraging ecology, evidence-based conservation, climate change, behavior, physiology, and health. Since 2007, he has focused on applied conservation biology and is keenly interested in the links among marine mammal population biology, ecology, and environmental change. His current research centers on determining impediments to Hawaiian monk seal recovery and designing rigorous, science-based interventions to improve population status. Dr. Baker joined the Marine Mammal Commission’s Committee of Scientific Advisors on Marine Mammals in 2013.

Sue E. Moore

Sue E. Moore, Ph.D.

Sue E. Moore

Sue E. Moore, Ph.D.

NOAA Fisheries, Office of Science and Technology

Seattle, Washington

Sue Moore is a biological oceanographer with over 35 years of research experience focused on the ecology, bioacoustics, and natural history of whales and dolphins, especially those found in Arctic waters.  She holds a B.A. in biology from the University of California, San Diego, a M.S. in biology from San Diego State University, and a Ph.D. in biological oceanography from Scripps Institution of Oceanography.  Dr. Moore has served as the Director of the Marine Mammal Laboratory (2002–2004) and Cetacean Program Leader (1998–2002) at NOAA’s Alaska Fisheries Science Center, and currently works as a Senior Scientist in NOAA’s Office of Science and Technology.  She is an affiliate professor in the Department of Biology and the School of Aquatic and Fisheries Sciences at the University of Washington.

Patricia E. Rosel, Ph.D.

Patricia E. Rosel, Ph.D.

NOAA Southeast Fisheries Science Center

Lafayette, Louisiana

Patricia Rosel is a research geneticist with NOAA Fisheries’ Southeast Fisheries Science Center Marine Mammal Program. She earned her Ph.D. in marine biology from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California, San Diego. Dr. Rosel’s dissertation research focused on population genetics, phylogeography and phylogenetics of the porpoise family Phocoenidae, as well as application of genetic data to distinguish cryptic species of dolphins. After finishing her Ph.D., she completed two post-doctoral research positions working on marine fish species. At the University of Chicago, Dr. Rosel examined worldwide population structure of swordfish, and at the University of New Hampshire she developed molecular methods to detect larval cod in the stomach contents of other fish species as part of a Georges Bank predation project. In 1997, she moved to the NOAA facility in Charleston, South Carolina, to return to research on marine mammal populations, completing work on harbor porpoises in the Atlantic and initiating a research program on population structure of common bottlenose dolphins along the U.S. East Coast. Currently, she runs the Marine Mammal Molecular Genetics Laboratory, which is a component of the NOAA Southeast Fisheries Science Center’s Marine Mammal Program and focuses on population structure, taxonomy and phylogenetics of cetaceans in the northwest Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico. Dr. Rosel joined the Commission’s Committee of Scientific Advisors on Marine Mammals in 2011.

Samantha Strindberg, Ph.D.

Samantha Strindberg, Ph.D.

Wildlife Conservation Society

Carmel Valley, CA

Samantha Strindberg is a Conservation Scientist and Wildlife Statistician in the Global Conservation Program of the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS), a US-based NGO. She provides statistical design and analysis assistance to WCS staff based at terrestrial and marine field sites world-wide. She focuses in particular on the appropriate application of continually evolving specialized techniques for wildlife surveys, and on conducting statistical analyses to investigate ecological and human-influenced relationships relevant to conservation management. Samantha also contributes to strategic conservation planning by developing conceptual models and theories of change, and by designing monitoring programs to assess the effectiveness of conservation activities. Her work covers whales, dolphins, fish, marine turtles, forest elephants, gorillas, chimpanzees, tigers, ungulates, and many other species across the world. Occasionally she has the pleasure of participating in field work, most often in marine surveys.

Samantha holds a Ph.D. in Statistics focused on Wildlife Population Assessment from the University of St Andrews, Scotland. While there, she was a member of the Research Unit for Wildlife Population Assessment (RUWPA), and also worked on projects including the mapping and survey design component of the Distance software, the International Whaling Commission’s Database-Estimation Software System, as well as data entry software for cetacean surveys. Samantha originally majored in Computer Science and Applied Mathematics at the University of Cape Town, South Africa. During this time she also worked on fisheries and marine mammal population assessments. She has published four book chapters on distance sampling and over 45 peer-reviewed papers covering topics such as abundance estimation, spatial distribution, temporal trends, survey techniques, and evidence-based conservation.

Robert Suydam

Robert Suydam, Ph.D.

Robert Suydam

Robert Suydam, Ph.D.

North Slope Borough

Barrow, Alaska

Robert Suydam earned a B.S. in environmental biology from California State University-Fresno in 1986 and an M.S. in biology from the University of Alaska Fairbanks in 1995. He has lived in Barrow, Alaska, and worked as a wildlife biologist for the North Slope Borough since 1990. His research interests have focused on working with Northern Alaska communities to monitor population trends and document natural history traits of bowhead and beluga whales, eiders, geese, and other Arctic species. Additionally, he works with subsistence hunters and oil and gas industry to identify, prioritize, and fill baseline study needs and data gaps. He also serves on the International Whaling Commission’s Scientific Committee, currently as their vice-chair. Dr. Suydam has authored or co-authored more than 75 peer-reviewed scientific publications and numerous scientific reports. In 2007, he received his Ph.D. from the University of Washington’s School of Aquatic and Fisheries Sciences. His doctoral work focused on the population dynamics and life history traits of beluga whales from the eastern Chukchi Sea. Dr. Suydam joined the Marine Mammal Commission’s Committee of Scientific Advisors on Marine Mammals in 2008.

Aaron M. Thode, Ph.D.

Aaron M. Thode, Ph.D.

Marine Physical Laboratory, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California

San Diego, California

Thode received his Bachelor of Science degree in physics and master’s degree in electrical engineering (specializing in antenna and radio propagation) concurrently in 1993 from Stanford University. He received his Ph.D. in Oceanography from Scripps in 1999. He was a postdoctoral scholar in ocean engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology from 1999-2001, before rejoining Scripps in 2002 as a Research Scientist.

In 2005, he received the A. B. Wood Medal from the UK’s Institute of Acoustics, “for distinguished contributions in the application of acoustics.” In 2008 he was elected a Fellow in the Acoustical Society of America for “contributions in signal processing to marine mammal acoustics”, and in 2011 he was awarded the Medwin Prize in Acoustical Oceanography by the same society, recognizing “a person for the effective use of sound in the discovery and understanding of physical and biological parameters and processes in the sea”.  Thode’s research ranges from the physics of underwater sound propagation to studies of the acoustic behavior of marine mammals off Alaska, California, and Mexico.

Randall Wells

Randall Wells, Ph.D.

Randall Wells

Randall Wells, Ph.D.

Chicago Zoological Society, Sarasota Dolphin Research Program

Sarasota, Florida

Randall Wells joined the Marine Mammal Commission’s Committee of Scientific Advisors in 2015. He is a senior conservation scientist with the Chicago Zoological Society, where he directs the Sarasota Dolphin Research Program. Dr. Wells obtained his Ph.D. from the University of California, Santa Cruz, and received a post-doctoral fellowship from Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. Dr. Wells’ current research program examines the behavior, social structure, life history, ecology, health, and population biology of resident bottlenose dolphins studied since 1970 along the Central West Coast of Florida, with studies focusing on anthropogenic impacts. In addition, Dr. Wells has been involved in research with vaquita; spinner and pantropical spotted dolphins; franciscanas; blue, gray, bowhead, and humpback whales; and manatees. Dr. Wells has engaged in interventions and the reintroduction and post-release monitoring of captive, rescued, and rehabilitated bottlenose, Risso’s, Guiana, and rough-toothed dolphins, as well as short-finned pilot whales. Dr. Wells was President of the Society for Marine Mammalogy from 2010 to 2012. Dr. Wells also serves on the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)/U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Atlantic Scientific Review Group, and he is past-chair of the NOAA Working Group on Marine Mammal Unusual Mortality Events. Dr. Wells serves on the International Union for Conservation of Nature’s Cetacean Specialist Group.

Vera Kingeekuk Metcalf

Vera Kingeekuk Metcalf

Special Advisor on Native Affairs

Vera Kingeekuk Metcalf

Vera Kingeekuk Metcalf

Special Advisor on Native Affairs

Eskimo Walrus Commission

Nome, Alaska

Vera Metcalf was born and raised in Savoonga (Sivungaq) on St. Lawrence Island, Alaska. Since 2002, she has been the Director of the Eskimo Walrus Commission (EWC) at Kawerak, Inc., which represents 19 coastal Alaskan communities in areas such as promoting community involvement in research, documenting local traditional ecological knowledge, and co-managing the Pacific walrus population. Ms. Metcalf represents the EWC in various forums, including the Indigenous People’s Council on Marine Mammals, the Arctic Marine Mammal Coalition, and the Arctic Waterways Safety Committee. She is a Special Advisor on Native Affairs on the Marine Mammal Commission, an advisory panel member of the North Pacific Research Board, a steering committee member for the Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy, a committee member on the Marine Advisory Program/University of Alaska Fairbanks, and a member of the Inuit Circumpolar Council Executive Committee and Alaska board. Ms. Metcalf is also a Bering Strait Commissioner for the U.S. Department of State, facilitating travel between Chukotka, Russia, and the Bering Straits region of Alaska. She is a strong advocate for the subsistence lifestyles of Alaska Native peoples, and is passionate about strengthening Alaska Native languages and cultures.

Commission Staff

Peter O. Thomas

Peter O. Thomas, Ph.D.

Executive Director

Peter O. Thomas

Peter O. Thomas, Ph.D.

Executive Director

Peter Thomas is the Executive Director of the Marine Mammal Commission. He earned his Ph.D. in Animal Behavior from the University of California, Davis, with research on southern right whales at Peninsula Valdés, Argentina. In the early 1980s, he was part of a team studying bowhead whale behavior in response to seismic testing in the Canadian Beaufort Sea. As Assistant to the Director of the Minnesota Zoological Gardens (1987-1991) Dr. Thomas led a review of the zoo’s marine mammal program. He joined the U.S. State Department in 1991 as a AAAS Science and Diplomacy Fellow. Over his career at State (1991-2001) he managed U.S. policy and international negotiations on the Convention on Biological Diversity and the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES). He was instrumental in the creation of the International Coral Reef Initiative (ICRI) and the U.S. Coral Reef Task Force and was the first ICRI Global Chair (1994-1996). From 1999-2001 Dr. Thomas served as the U.S. Advisor for Scientific and Technological Affairs to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development in Paris. He joined the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in 2001 as Chief of the Division of Management Authority, the office that oversees permitting and policy for U.S. wildlife imports and exports under the CITES Convention.

Dr. Thomas joined the Marine Mammal Commission in 2008 as International and Policy Program Director, overseeing reviews of proposed actions under the Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA), Endangered Species Act (ESA), National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), and other statutes and treaties and domestic policy related to the Arctic, climate change, sound, energy development, and shipping. He led the Commission’s international work with a focus on acute marine mammal conservation issues such as the endangered vaquita porpoise, conservation of freshwater cetaceans, and the response of marine mammals to the effects of climate change. He is lead author of the 2015 assessment of the Status of the World’s Baleen Whales.

Dee Allen

Dee Allen

Research Program Officer

Dee Allen

Dee Allen

Research Program Officer

Dee Allen joined the Marine Mammal Commission’s team in 2014 as the Research Program Officer. She earned her B.S. (Towson State University) and M.S. (The George Washington University) degrees in biological sciences. Her master’s thesis research on the use of mandibular morphometric analyses for distinguishing species and sex of beaked whales earned her the John G. Shedd Aquarium Award from the Society for Marine Mammalogy and the Sylvia L. Bunting Prize from the George Washington University. Ms. Allen has volunteered with the Sarasota Dolphin Research Program since 1991, assisting with health assessments, telemetry, photo identification, and behavioral observations of bottlenose dolphins. From 1996 to 2007, she worked with the Smithsonian Institution’s Marine Mammal Program at the National Museum of Natural History (NMNH) and maintains active collaborations with this program as a Research Associate. At NMNH, she managed the Cetacean Distributional Database, participated in necropsies and anatomical studies of cetaceans, led the collaborative development of an online reference for identifying beaked whale specimens, and participated in numerous student mentorship opportunities and outreach events. Ms. Allen worked with the National Marine Mammal Laboratory at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA’s) Alaska Fisheries Science Center (AFSC) for seven years. At NOAA’s AFSC, she coordinated the annual development of the Alaska Marine Mammal Stock Assessment Reports (SARs), served as Fisheries Liaison to the Alaska Scientific Review Group, managed the Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA) and the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) import and export permits, and coordinated reviews of permit applications at the request of the Fisheries Permit Division. She also compiled human-caused mortality and injury data on Alaskan marine mammals and assessed the severity of injuries under the agency’s Serious Injury Policy for use in the SARs and List of Fisheries. Ms. Allen has participated as a member of marine mammal field research teams with the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, NOAA’s Northeast and Alaska Fisheries Science Centers, and Duke University. As a member of the Commission’s Scientific Program, Ms. Allen administers the Commission’s research grants program and provides scientific support to the program and the Commission.

Tiffini J. Brookens

Tiffini J. Brookens

Biologist (Authorizations and Permits)

Tiffini J. Brookens

Tiffini J. Brookens

Biologist (Authorizations and Permits)

Tiffini Brookens is a biologist for the Marine Mammal Commission. In 2001, she earned a B.S. in biology and marine science, with minors in chemistry and environmental science. In 2006, she earned an M.S. in marine science, with an emphasis in marine mammalogy, from Moss Landing Marine Laboratories at California State University, Monterey Bay. Her master’s thesis focused on trace element concentrations in live-captured and dead, stranded harbor seals throughout central and northern California. While in graduate school, Ms. Brookens served as a member of the Monterey County Marine Mammal and Sea Turtle Stranding Network, and she later worked as a marine mammal technician to determine body burden assessments of total mercury in harbor seal pups. In 2007, she began work as a marine biologist at the Naval Undersea Warfare Center Division, Newport, in Rhode Island. While with the Navy, she drafted and reviewed compliance documentation in support of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), the Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA), the Endangered Species Act (ESA), and Executive Order 12114 regarding acoustic and impulsive effects of the Navy’s testing and training activities on marine mammals. Ms. Brookens has been at the Commission since 2010 and is tasked with reviewing, evaluating, and commenting on applications and documents involving marine mammals (primarily the taking of) under the MMPA, ESA, NEPA, Antarctic Conservation Act, National Defense Authorization Act, Animal Welfare Act, and Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES). A large portion of her job at the Commission entails providing technical expertise regarding the effects of underwater sound on marine mammals.

Victoria R. Cornish

Energy Policy Analyst

Victoria R. Cornish

Energy Policy Analyst

Victoria Cornish is the Marine Mammal Commission’s energy policy analyst. She holds a B.S. in biology from the University of California at San Diego and an M.S. in biological oceanography from the University of Miami. Prior to joining the Commission, Ms. Cornish served as Director of Marine Wildlife Policy for the Ocean Conservancy, where she led the organization’s efforts to conserve marine mammals and endangered species by providing scientific and policy expertise on fisheries bycatch, marine debris, vessel strikes, ecotourism, and Endangered Species Act listing actions. Ms. Cornish also worked for 15 years at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA’s) National Marine Fisheries Service, where she was involved in the development and implementation of the 1994 amendments to the Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA). She represented the agency on several take reduction teams, initiated the National Observer Program, and served as the Marine Mammal Branch Chief for the agency’s Southeast Regional Office in St. Petersburg, Florida. At the Commission, Ms. Cornish focuses on the effects of offshore oil and gas and renewable energy activities on marine mammals and their environment, as well as the enhancement of policies and programs to better understand and minimize those effects.

Michael L. Gosliner

Michael L. Gosliner, Esq.

General Counsel

Michael L. Gosliner

Michael L. Gosliner, Esq.

General Counsel

Michael Gosliner is the General Counsel of the Marine Mammal Commission, a position he has held since 1987. He holds an undergraduate degree in biology from the University of California at Berkeley and a J.D. from the University of California’s Hastings College of the Law. He was a founding member of the Hastings Environmental Law Association, an affiliation that led to him securing an internship with the White House Domestic Policy Staff. Mr. Gosliner served as a staff attorney with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA’s) Office of General Counsel beginning in 1983, where he specialized in issues related to the Endangered Species Act (ESA) and the Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA). While at NOAA, he was the primary author of regulations governing subsistence hunting of fur seals, was a principle author of regulations implementing Section 7 of the ESA, and represented the agency in a formal rulemaking authorizing the incidental taking of marine mammals in commercial fishing operations. As General Counsel, he oversees the legal affairs of the Commission. Among his many positions, he serves as the Commission’s ethics official, tribal liaison, committee management officer, National Environmental Policy Act liaison, and Freedom of Information Act officer. A recognized expert on the MMPA, Mr. Gosliner has lead responsibility for the development of Commission positions regarding interpretation and implementation of the Act. He also serves as the staff lead on a variety of other issues, including the conservation of polar bears and Cook Inlet beluga whales.

Dennis Heinemann

Dennis Heinemann, Ph.D.

Senior Adviser for Fisheries Policy & Ecology

Dennis Heinemann

Dennis Heinemann, Ph.D.

Senior Adviser for Fisheries Policy & Ecology

Dennis Heinemann joined the Marine Mammal Commission as the Director of Science in 2011. Dr. Heinemann holds master’s degrees in avian ecology and statistics and a Ph.D. in marine ecology. His research experience includes community dynamics, oil spill impacts, population dynamics, fisheries bycatch, fish stock-assessment modeling, fisheries management and policy, and marine protected area policy and design. For much of the 1990s, Dr. Heinemann was a senior research scientist in the Division of Marine Research of Australia’s Commonwealth Science and Industry Research Organization, where he worked on interactions between longline fisheries and seabirds, marine reserve design and performance, and human impacts on nearshore marine ecosystems. Prior to that, he held a variety of academic and research positions in the United States, during which time he undertook scientific studies of the pelagic community dynamics of seabirds in Alaska; impacts of oil development and spills on marine birds and mammals in Alaska and Southern California; foraging ecology of endangered terns in California and Massachusetts; and the predator-prey relationships of seabirds, fur seals, and their principal prey, krill, in Antarctica. In 2001 and 2002, he worked for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA’s) National Marine Fisheries Service, conducting assessment analyses on Gulf of Mexico fish stocks. Prior to joining the Commission, Dr. Heinemann was senior scientist at Ocean Conservancy in Washington, D.C., where he provided leadership and support on conservation issues associated with marine fisheries, ocean climate change, and marine protected areas. At the Commission, he oversees or directs the Commission’s science programs and activities, gives scientific advice, and provides leadership on issues related to fisheries and marine protected areas.

Darel E. Jordan

Staff Assistant

Darel E. Jordan

Staff Assistant

Since 1989, Darel Jordan has served as a staff assistant for the Marine Mammal Commission. She initially served for several years as office receptionist. Beginning in 2006, Ms. Jordan began providing support to the Commission’s Administrative Officer on a diverse range of tasks, including processing invoices, preparing travel paperwork, and maintaining administrative records and spreadsheets.

Jennafer Malek

Jennafer Malek, Ph.D.

Co-Management Fellow

Jennafer Malek

Jennafer Malek, Ph.D.

Co-Management Fellow

Jennafer Malek is a Co-Management Fellow with the Marine Mammal Commission. Dr. Malek completed a B.S. in Marine Science at the University of Maine in 2005 where she evaluated the differences in feeding strategies between East and West coast humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliea) populations for her senior capstone research. She then completed a M.S. in Marine, Estuarine, and Environmental Science from the University of Maryland, College Park in 2010. For her M.S., she studied the effects of environmental gradients on parasite infections in the eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica, throughout the Chesapeake Bay, based out of the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center (SERC) in Edgewater, MD. Following the completion of her thesis, she collaborated with ecologists at SERC and other mid-Atlantic institutions to investigate how shoreline modification in Chesapeake Bay alters fish and invertebrate communities. In December 2015, Dr. Malek earned her PhD in Ecology from the Odum School of Ecology at the University of Georgia (UGA). Her dissertation research focused on the effects of environmental factors, including air temperature and predators, on parasite infection patterns and host immune response in oysters, and how such host-parasite interactions may be affected by changes in climate. During her time at UGA she also contributed to several large-scale collaborations assessing the effects of biogeography on trophic cascades on coastal systems and completed the Interdisciplinary Certificate in University Teaching through the UGA Graduate School. Dr. Malek previously worked with the Commission in 2016 as a Knauss Marine Policy Fellow. During that time, she was part of the Commission’s Alaska Communications Team and wrote a grant proposal for funding through the North Pacific Research Board to conduct a review of marine mammal co-management in Alaska. This proposal was funded in July 2017 and Jenna returned to the Commission January 2018. For the duration of the project she is based in Anchorage, Alaska where she is collaborating with Alaska Native communities and other federal agencies to review co-management of marine mammal subsistence species. Before returning to the Commission, Dr. Malek served as a Communications and Policy Specialist with the NOAA Marine Debris Program in 2017, where she focused on congressional engagement and increasing public awareness of the issue of marine debris in the world’s ocean. Her efforts to address marine debris continue with the Commission as she serves as its representative on the Interagency Marine Debris Coordinating Committee, led by NOAA.

Phyllis P. Malloy

Phyllis P. Malloy

Administrative Support Assistant

Phyllis P. Malloy

Phyllis P. Malloy

Administrative Support Assistant

Phyllis Malloy is the new Administrative Support Assistant for the Marine Mammal Commission. She is a native of Fairmont, North Carolina and an alumnus of the University of North Carolina at Greensboro where she earned a B.S. degree in Recreation and Leisure Studies with a concentration in Therapeutic Recreation. Ms. Malloy brings 20 years of administrative experience and training with the U.S. Air Force as an Administrative Specialist/Information Manager. In addition to her honorable Air Force career, she holds an A. S. degree in Information Management from the Community College of the Air Force and an A.S. degree in Office Systems Technology from Central Carolina Technical College. Ms. Malloy brings a strong love for animals of both land and sea. She joined the Commission staff in 2015.

Cathy Shrestha

Administrative Officer

Cathy Shrestha

Administrative Officer

Cathy Shrestha holds a B.A. in economics from Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut, and an M.A. in South Asian Studies from the University of Wisconsin at Madison. She began her career as a Peace Corps volunteer in Nepal, working on a program that provided credit to small farmers. She has worked in international development at both non-profit organizations and at the Peace Corps Headquarters. At the Peace Corps, she held positions as a country desk officer, management analyst, and administrative officer. Prior to joining the Marine Mammal Commission, Ms. Shrestha worked as a budget analyst at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Office of Marine and Aviation Operations.

Samantha E. Simmons

Samantha E. Simmons, Ph.D.

Acting Scientific Program Director

Samantha E. Simmons

Samantha E. Simmons, Ph.D.

Acting Scientific Program Director

Samantha Simmons is the Assistant Scientific Program Director of the Marine Mammal Commission. She is a marine biologist by training with an emphasis on marine mammal biology. Dr. Simmons was born and raised in the United Kingdom and completed her BSc. (Hons.) in marine and environmental biology at Scotland’s University of St. Andrews in 2000. She moved to the United States to pursue graduate studies, joining Dr. Daniel Costa’s laboratory at the University of California, Santa Cruz, in 2001, where she earned an M.S. in marine science and then a Ph.D. in ecology and evolutionary biology. Her master’s research considered the behavior of northern elephant seals in relation to oceanography, using satellite remote-sensed oceanographic data. Her Ph.D. research examined the foraging success of pinnipeds in relation to the sub-surface thermal structure of the water column. During a one-year postdoctoral fellowship at the university, Dr. Simmons initiated a research project on the foraging energetics of elephant seals. In 2009, she assumed her current position at the Commission where she where she advises on the use of the best available science in policy decisions. She is also involved with several projects focused on evaluating impacts from natural and anthropogenic sources on marine mammals, including cumulative impacts. Additionally, Dr. Simmons is engaged with several efforts to improve the standardization and availability of biological data, including developing an Animal Telemetry Network, developing a marine mammal health monitoring and analysis platform, and engaging with the global community on similar issues as co-chair of the Global Ocean Observing System’s Biology and Ecosystems Panel. Dr. Simmons also oversees the Commission’s research grant program. Information on Dr. Simmons’ professional activities, research, and publications can be found here.

Brady O'Donnell

Communications & Policy Analyst, 2018 Knauss Fellow

Brady O'Donnell

Communications & Policy Analyst, 2018 Knauss Fellow

Brady O’Donnell is a 2018 Knauss Marine Policy Fellow through the NOAA Sea Grant program. Brady’s role with the MMC will be varied, but will include legislative affairs and communications, public engagement, and policy review. Brady completed a B.S. at Eckerd College in 2015 with a double major in Marine Science and Environmental Studies, minoring in Political Science. While at Eckerd College, his undergraduate research focused on the linkages between human impacts to the environment in marine sediments, including work on the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill in the Gulf of Mexico as well as sediment pollution to coral habitats in St. John, US Virgin Islands. From 2015-2017, he worked towards a Master’s degree in Geology at the University of California, Davis focused on the carbon sequestration of seagrass meadows in Northeastern Pacific estuaries. While in graduate school, Brady pursued scientific communication opportunities with the NOAA National Marine Sanctuaries as well as coral reef restoration and international collaboration in Sulawesi, Indonesia to enrich his extracurricular education.